Artist Gallery Photo

The Jazz Epistles featuring Abdullah Ibrahim & Ekaya with Terence Blanchard

Fri, Feb 16 - Sat, Feb 17, 2018




Friday-Sunday doors open at 5:30PM.
Monday-Thursday doors at 6:00PM.
First sets begin at 7:30 PM, and second sets (when applicable) begin at 9:30 PM (doors: 9:15 PM).

All purchases are nonrefundable/nonexchangeable.

$46.50 Includes a $6.00 Service fee

In the event the show is canceled or rescheduled, the $6.00 service fee is nonrefundable.

Tickets may be purchased on-line or by phone.
Night of show seating typically available.

Vouchers, promotional certificates, donated gift certificates, student discounts, senior discounts, children under 12 free discounts and 2 for 1 cards are not applicable for this show.


The Pacific Jazz Institute at Dimitiriou's Jazz Alley is excited to announce a unique collaboration between jazz legend and founding member of Jazz Epistles Abdullah Ibrahim (piano), his 7-piece band Ekaya and 4x Grammy-winner Terence Blanchard (tumpet). Show times Friday and Saturday at 7:30pm and 9:30pm. Doors open at 5:30pm each night.

artist info

Legendary South African music - a concert to tell the story of The Jazz Epistles, arguably the most important jazz album ever recorded in its country’s history. This music was almost lost forever — only 500 copies were made in 1959, buried, and rediscovered decades later after the tyranny of apartheid.

“South Africa’s Mozart.” – Nelson Mandela about Abdullah Ibrahim

“It’s the first all-black modern South African jazz recording.” – Gwen Ansell, author

“This story hasn’t been written yet. It’s a hidden history and it’s waiting to be told.” – Sazi Dlamini, ethnomusicologist

“At a time when apartheid itself was very backward looking, you had a collection of black musicians who were saying very defiantly: We are here, we are modern-city people, there is no way you are going to exclude us from modern life. And that is the beautiful undertone in that music.” — Gwen

During the era of apartheid in South Africa, jazz signified a special kind of threat to the white nationalist regime. Not only did its swing and syncopation resemble African rhythm, the music also invited a breeding opportunity for the thoughts it conveyed. In a place fortified by only separation, jazz inspired the mixing of people from all backgrounds and fostered modern ideas. In this animation, the legendary South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim tells us how jazz and improvisation saved his life. - Simon Renter

"Four-time Grammy winning trumpeter, Terence Blanchard is a restless soul. His career is like a jazz chart, filled with unseen turns, twists and handoffs." - Wall Street Journal

videos